Solstice Greetings

Can you imagine what it was like for our ancestors? Damp, cold, standing water in the grasslands, dark days with only a fire for light and warmth? It certainly makes sense that they would create monuments to the Sun, calibrated to align with the Sun on the solstice when the sun is at its highest and the length of the day is longest. How they must have yearned for summer. How they must have watched for the signs of the turning of the seasons.

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Something Special about Celtic Lambs and Sheep

The picture above is one of my favorites. I came over the rise of the hill leading up to my favorite stone circle. There-smack dab in the middle of what I consider sacred space- was this little cutie looking right at me. I not only got the perfect picture but we also had quite a nice I-Thou communication going until his mother scurried him away. I liked the picture so much I chose it for the back cover of my new novel Amidst the Stones.

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Lough Gur: Stone Circles, Fairies, and Swans by Leah Eggleston Krygowski

Lough Gur is one of the magical sites in Ireland often overlooked by tour buses and tourists, making it all the more worth visiting. Lough Gur is also the site of the Grange stone circle and enchanting ancient ruins. See Snapshots of Clare and Limerick for more.

 

 This guest blog is from Leah Eggleston Krygowski, a book reviewer, avid reader, and aspiring writer who recently caught the international travel bug following her first trip to Ireland. She lives in New Hampshire with her husband, John, and their two Cairn terriers.

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Tarot Card for June The World Tree

No, dear reader, this is not a test of your memory. Last month at this time, you did read that I had pulled the World Tree as our tarot card for May. Here it is again; but, pulled from a different deck and at a different time. The coincidence is stunning, especially when we had seen it before in February.

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The Uffington White Horse

Let’s imagine today that we are traveling through the green, rolling hills of Oxfordshire, England. There on a far hillside we see a white horse. At least, we see a free-flowing, dynamic outline of a creature in motion that is usually viewed as a horse. Now imagine being of a time long ago when people were not exposed to media as we are today. It must have been an even more awesome and wonderous sight.

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Beltane Fire Festivals

Writing about Beltane is a bit like writing about Christmas; the holiday has so many different traditions and its celebrations has many layers of meaning. Visiting Celtic cultures during May Day festivities also reminds me of U.S. Memorial Day when all take vacation and hold picnics and parades. Some think of the original meaning of the day; others just see a long weekend to unwind.

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The World Tree -Our Tarot Card for May

Regular readers know that I choose a tarot or oracle deck at the beginning of each month and pull one card that becomes our focus or meditation for the month.  Astute readers will also know that we just had the World Tree as our symbol for February. I could have chosen a second card, but I believe there is a reason a card comes up. Perhaps, we need to interpret the card differently. Perhaps there is a new message or a message for someone in our community. Perhaps, the state of the world right now begs for us to remember that we are all One, that we are connected to the Universe and that the steady oak survives.

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Brigid: A Gateway to Wholeness

You’re reading this article while living in a sadly partisan world, one where the brand of shoes one buys, or the food chain one eats at, or entertainment choices, are seen as indicative of one’s place in a world divided between “us” and “them.” To restore the wholeness of Western civilization in our time we need more examples of “both-and” thinking, more myths that can look across cultural borders and say, “we are them.” We need tales that show us how to be passionate supporters of justice while at the same time viewing with fondness those with whom we differ. Brigid is such a figure, she is a gateway between religious traditions, between traditional gendered roles, between socio-economic divides, between the human-and-animal realm, and between mundane reality and the realms of imagination.

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