Brigid: A Gateway to Wholeness

You’re reading this article while living in a sadly partisan world, one where the brand of shoes one buys, or the food chain one eats at, or entertainment choices, are seen as indicative of one’s place in a world divided between “us” and “them.” To restore the wholeness of Western civilization in our time we need more examples of “both-and” thinking, more myths that can look across cultural borders and say, “we are them.” We need tales that show us how to be passionate supporters of justice while at the same time viewing with fondness those with whom we differ. Brigid is such a figure, she is a gateway between religious traditions, between traditional gendered roles, between socio-economic divides, between the human-and-animal realm, and between mundane reality and the realms of imagination.

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Jeanne CraneComment
Upcoming Guest Blogger Kenneth McIntosh

Kenneth McIntosh will return as guest blogger on Monday, April 22, 2019 with a blog entitled Brigid: A Gateway to Wholeness

Kenneth is author of Water From The Ancient Well and other books on Celtic spirituality. He has traveled extensively in the British Isles and has presented workshops in both the U.K. and the U.S on the topic. He also serves as minister of The United Church of Christ in Honeoye, New York. I have been enjoying exchanging ideas and experiencing based on our shared passion for the subject and am sure you will enjoy his views as well. Check him out on Facebook, Amazon and/or Anamchara Books.

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Donegal Mystique By Sinéad Tyrone, guest blogger

I’d like to share with you a bit of my passion for and experiences in Donegal County, Ireland.

Donegal County, not to be confused with Donegal Town, is in the upper left region of Ireland. It’s a remote, mountainous place with relatively few inhabitants compared to the rest of the country. To me, Donegal has always been a mystical word, whispered across the winds of my mind, not spoken out loud as if verbalizing the word would break some magical spell.

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Jeanne CraneComment
Upcoming Guest Blogger

Our guest speaker next Monday will be Sinéad Tyrone, a Buffalo author whose works convey a love of Ireland that may very well surpass my own. She will be writing about her beloved Donegal, featured in Walking Through The Mist and Crossing The Lough Between (novels) and her book of poetry, A Song Of Ireland.

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Jeanne CraneComment
The Fifth Celtic Nation – The Isle of Man

When I read that there were 5 Celtic Nations. I easily could list Scotland, Ireland, England (Cornwall) and Wales, but I had to look up the fifth. I had only a vague notion of the Isle of Man, the fifth on the list. Introduced to it on the internet, I decided I just had to visit. Of course, the clincher was the picture of one of its stone circles, a passion of mine.

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Jeanne CraneComment
April Fools' Day

All readers will receive a free trip to Ireland just for reading this line.

April Fools!

I wish I could gift you all a trip, but I do hope reading this blog connects you to Celtic lands vicariously and promotes new travel experiences as well. We are wrapping up the Snapshots: Travels in Ireland project that will offer Cork, Kerry, Clare/Limerick and Galway/Aran Islands on Kindle as well as Amazon in the next two weeks. Please at least browse them when the announcement comes out.

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As We Rise Today

As we rise today, perhaps after too much Guinness or green beer, it seems appropriate to lift up the real Patrick. The revelry of St. Patrick’s Day in the USA is shared by huge numbers even here in the northeast where the weather doesn’t really lend itself to outdoor parades. But, the US Census does report that 34.5 million Americans list their heritage as either primarily or partially Irish. That is worthy of celebration. (It will be fun to see how the surge of interest in AncestryDNA and 23andMe impact the next census.)

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Return to the Earth by Elaine Ní Chiardha

Guest Post by Elaine Ní Chiardha

All native spiritualities, including Celtic and pre-Celtic Irish traditions, teach the interconnection between all beings - between humans and the beings of nature, and indeed the spirit world. To return to and remember this awareness, which is innate to us all, is to heal. To heal ourselves, our relationship to one another and to the world. It is true, the old adage - nature is the greatest healer.

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Jeanne CraneComment
Drawing the March Hare

This is the third time we begin the month with a tarot or oracle card. And, once again, it is an uncanny pick.  Here we are in March and I drew a picture of March hares. I must admit that I have only a distant memory of the March hare in Alice in Wonderland and a fainter memory yet of the phrase “mad as a March hare”. A bit of research tells me these big hares do live in Celtic lands, that they jump around and “box” all night, acting mad from a human perspective. People are most likely to witness this crazy activity at dawn in March when light is optimal and breeding season makes the hares most active. Thus, the Brits coined the term “mad as a March hare”.

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